Digital Literacy

Genes -> Memes -> Temes

Posted in Uncategorized by Geoffrey Morris on October 23, 2008

So we’re gearing up to make some creatures in Flash.  This touches obliquely on the theme of artificial life, a topic we discussed earlier in reference to the Game of Life.  In preperation for class, please view this talk discussing the relationship between genes (biological informational replicants) memes (semantic informational replicants) and temes (technological informational replicants).  Also read Hans Christian Andersen’s Nightengale.  Post a response to these memes (temes?) on your blog.

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Flashmobs everywhere!

Posted in Uncategorized by Geoffrey Morris on October 23, 2008

We talked about flashmobs, spontanious crowds united with minimal organization through the use of networked technology.  This technique has been adopted by protesters, artists, and advertisers

Here’s a flashmob that took place recently in Dolores Park, SF:

Gotta make them pape[r prototype]s

Posted in Uncategorized by Geoffrey Morris on October 23, 2008

As the mashup-a-thon continues, we explore some techniques for interaction design development.  Students proposed, outlined, and prototyped applications using 2D paper mockups, then taped a user test.  Here’s one:

A series of pipes.

Posted in Uncategorized by Geoffrey Morris on October 23, 2008

We looked at a bunch of mashups, and the creator of fastfoodmaps.com gave a lecture on the types of ideation that lead to the creation of these hybrid apps.  The class used Yahoo Pipes to create some mashups of their own.  Here’s a link to the DLiteracy meta-feed, a pipe which aggregates all posts from this and each of the student’s blogs into a single RSS feed.

The Voight-Kampff test and you

Posted in Uncategorized by Geoffrey Morris on October 23, 2008

In class we discussed CAPTCHAs, those little speedbumps on web page registration forms that try to keep bots from signing up for accounts (typically, this involves reading some smudged words or transcribing garbled audio).  The class was charged with devising some techniques for determining whether a person they were talking to was a human, or just a sophisticated bot.